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Thursday, September 25, 2008

Thought on Google Chrome?

Time to compare web browsers. Do any of you web savvy browser mavens have insights into the new browser "Google Chrome?" Is it worth investigating?

I prefer Firefox over everything I've tried because it's just super customizable and functional for me. Some webpages only work properly when viewed on IE, so I do keep that one around basically put I have to. I tried Safari but didn't like it. Opera is great because it is super fast. I've even used Flock which is very cool for social networking. Now what about Chrome?

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3 comments:

Dan @ Necessary Roughness said...

Chrome is fast, lean, and offers a nice "incognito" mode. It doesn't handle web proxies very well, so it's not very useful in some hotels or behind corporate firewalls.

More info: NR article.

toddpeperkorn said...

I'm mostly a Mac user, but I have a virtual Windows system. So I've used Chrome and like the simplicity of it. However, I have yet to see how it holds any advantage over Firefox.

Stan Lemon said...

Under the hood Chrome is no different than Apple's Safari (Windows or Mac). In fact, Google is so creative and innovative with Chrome that they're actually using the Webkit (that's the core of Safari) from Apple. Webkit is open source, so all they've done is forked it and built a new UI on it. The cool thing about Chrome, which distinguished it from the rest of the browser world is that it runs each tab as a separate process. If you've ever had a browser crash on you with multiple tabs open and you lose all that's open you know of the woes of single process browser engines. Chrome essentially prevents you from losing all that, because if a page causes the renderer to crash it only kills the tab for the page that caused the crash - not the whole browser. Apart from that (which if you're a developer is extremely cool) Chrome is nothing special.

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